Double Six

Yutaka Sone

Exhibition: Dec 7, 2000 – Jan 14, 2001


Yutaka Sone brings together entertainment and art, fiction and fantasy in his Artpace project. His video, Double Six is a tightly orchestrated production, shot in the Texas Hill Country. Sone presents an unlikely vision of a cowboy on a horse chasing a helicopter that carries a pair of enormous dice. As the helicopter flies across the rural landscape, the dice are released and tumble onto the dusty ground. The cowboy rides off into the landscape.

Taking a cue from Hollywood Westerns and action movies, Sone’s landscape is larger-than-life. Double Six’s accompanying soundtrack, composed by Yoshio Yamabe, enhances the video’s ironic character, with its retro, easy-listening-meets-Bossanova style.

In the exhibition, the video is accompanied by drawings that document the filmmaking process, including a large work on cowhide. The drawings highlight aspects of the Western landscape and the collaborative nature of filmmaking, giving credit to the cast and crew.

Sone is a nomadic artist, and Double Six is certainly informed by the artist’s extensive travels, as well as the dominance of American imagery in media. Western movies, Las Vegas, and surveillance helicopters all merge into one indelible image. Sone observes the ongoing myth and promise of the American frontier and processes it into a humorous, engaging narrative. Sone’s flying dice cleverly exaggerates the idea of chance: in the Western landscape, you win some and you lose some.

Yutaka Sone brings together entertainment and art, fiction and fantasy in his Artpace project. His video, Double Six is a tightly orchestrated production, shot in the Texas Hill Country. Sone presents an unlikely vision of a cowboy on a horse chasing a helicopter that carries a pair of enormous dice. As the helicopter flies across the rural landscape, the dice are released and tumble onto the dusty ground. The cowboy rides off into the landscape.

Taking a cue from Hollywood Westerns and action movies, Sone’s landscape is larger-than-life. Double Six’s accompanying soundtrack, composed by Yoshio Yamabe, enhances the video’s ironic character, with its retro, easy-listening-meets-Bossanova style.

In the exhibition, the video is accompanied by drawings that document the filmmaking process, including a large work on cowhide. The drawings highlight aspects of the Western landscape and the collaborative nature of filmmaking, giving credit to the cast and crew.

Sone is a nomadic artist, and Double Six is certainly informed by the artist’s extensive travels, as well as the dominance of American imagery in media. Western movies, Las Vegas, and surveillance helicopters all merge into one indelible image. Sone observes the ongoing myth and promise of the American frontier and processes it into a humorous, engaging narrative. Sone’s flying dice cleverly exaggerates the idea of chance: in the Western landscape, you win some and you lose some.

Yutaka Sone brings together entertainment and art, fiction and fantasy in his Artpace project. His video, Double Six is a tightly orchestrated production, shot in the Texas Hill Country. Sone presents an unlikely vision of a cowboy on a horse chasing a helicopter that carries a pair of enormous dice. As the helicopter flies across the rural landscape, the dice are released and tumble onto the dusty ground. The cowboy rides off into the landscape.

Taking a cue from Hollywood Westerns and action movies, Sone’s landscape is larger-than-life. Double Six’s accompanying soundtrack, composed by Yoshio Yamabe, enhances the video’s ironic character, with its retro, easy-listening-meets-Bossanova style.

In the exhibition, the video is accompanied by drawings that document the filmmaking process, including a large work on cowhide. The drawings highlight aspects of the Western landscape and the collaborative nature of filmmaking, giving credit to the cast and crew.

Sone is a nomadic artist, and Double Six is certainly informed by the artist’s extensive travels, as well as the dominance of American imagery in media. Western movies, Las Vegas, and surveillance helicopters all merge into one indelible image. Sone observes the ongoing myth and promise of the American frontier and processes it into a humorous, engaging narrative. Sone’s flying dice cleverly exaggerates the idea of chance: in the Western landscape, you win some and you lose some.

Artist

Yutaka Sone

Tokyo, Japan

Yutaka Sone was born in 1965 in Shizuoka, Japan and currently lives in Tokyo and Los Angeles. He holds a B.F.A. and an M.A. in architecture from Tokyo Geijutsu University. Sone has exhibited his work throughout Asia, including solo exhibitions at the Art Tower Mito, Mito, Japan (1993); Roesntgen Kunst Institute, Tokyo, Japan (1995); Mitaka City Arts Foundation, Japan (1996); Hiroshima Contemporary Art Museum, Japan (1997); Shiseido Art House, Kakegawa, Japan (1998); AARA, Bangkok, Thailand (1998); and Sogestu Art Museum, Tokyo, Japan (1999). He participated in 1997’s Sculpture Project Munster, the travelling exhibition Cities on the Move(originating at Wiener Secession, Vienna, Austria in 1997); Unfinished History at the Walker Arts Center, Minneapolis (1998); and EXPO 2000, Hanover, Germany (2000). The Public Art Fund in New York has commissioned a major project that will open in 2001. His ArtPace project is his first institutional solo exhibition in the U.S.
Yutaka Sone takes elements of American culture and pushes them to the extreme with humor and immediacy. Through video, installation and drawings, he transforms everyday events into spectacle.
Yutaka Sone was chosen for his ArtPace residency by the March 1998 panel consisting of Dan Cameron, Annette DiMeo Carlozzi, Amada Cruz, Kellie Jones, Hans-Ulrich Obrist, and Nancy Rubins.

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Curators

Amada Cruz

Los Angeles, CA
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Kellie Jones

New York, NY
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Nancy Rubins

Topanga, California, USA

Born in 1952 in Naples, Texas, Californian Nancy Rubins received her MFA from the University of California, Davis. She has had numerous solo exhibitions, including shows at Paul Kasmin Gallery, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and the Venice Biennale Aperto. Rubins’ work was included in the 1995 Whitney Biennial and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles’ Helter Skelter exhibit in 1992. Rubins teaches at the University of California, Los Angeles’ Art Department. She has received grants from the Rockefeller Foundation, the Tiffany Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

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Annette DiMeo Carlozzi

Austin, TX
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Dan Cameron

Newport Beach, California

From 2012 to 2015 he was Chief Curator at the Orange County Museum of Art in Newport Beach, California. In 2006, Dan Cameron founded the Biennial Prospect New Orleans, where he worked at until 2011. From 1995 to 2005 he was Senior Curator at the New Museum, New York, where he developed numerous group exhibitions, such as East Village USA and Living inside the Grid, and several individual shows dedicated to the artists Martin Wong, William Kentridge, Carolee Schneemann, Carroll Dunham, Doris Salcedo, José Antonio Hernández Diez, among others.
As independent curator he has organized many exhibitions that brought him international attention, such as El arte y su doble (Fundación Caixa, Madrid, 1987); El jardín salvaje (Fundación Caixa, Barcelona, 1991); Cocido y crudo (Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, 1995), among many others. In 2003, he was the Artistic Director of the 8th Istanbul Biennial, and in 2006, Co-curator of the 5th Taipei Biennial.
He has published hundreds of texts in books, catalogues and magazines, and has given numerous talks and conferences at museums and universities around the world, also carrying out an important teaching activity in New York.

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Hans Ulrich Obrist

London, England

Hans Ulrich-Obrist is the Co-Director of Exhibitions and Programs and Director of International Projects at the Serpentine Gallery in London, positions created for Ulrich-Obrist in April 2006. As a curator at the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, France since 2000, among many other exhibitions he organized solo shows with Jonas Mekas (2003), Anri Sala (2004), and Cerith Wyn Evans (2006). Before this position Ulrich-Obrist was an independent curator for a decade, organizing the group show Take Me I’m Yours at the Serpentine (1995) and Retrace Your Steps: Remember at the John Soane Museum (1999), also in London, England. Ulrich-Obrist was a panelist in 1998 for the 1999-2000 year of artists, and was invited to be a speaker at the 2003 symposium, but was unable to come due to illness.
Photo by Dominik Gigler

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